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New Hampshire Pregnant Women Almost Had Their Very Own Purge

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New Hampshire, the taint of New England, has accidentally done something hilarious. While attempting to pass a fetal homicide bill, the state senate actually voted to allow pregnant women to commit murder with impunity.

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kleer001
22 hours ago
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Or like patton oswalt jokes, at age 100 you can legally murder... only with your own hands
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Tim Molloy’s Strange, Vivid Worlds

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New Zealander Tim Molloy crafts strange worlds in his illustrations, comics, and commercial work. Recalling artists like Moebius and Jim Woodring, Molloy's rich, detailed pieces are packed with surreal imagery. The artist’s tight linework makes his dreamlike narratives into vivid jaunts into the unknown.
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kleer001
2 days ago
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Constantly baffled how folks routinely confuse political objections to policy with technical procedural objections to its implementation.

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Constantly baffled how folks routinely confuse political objections to policy with technical procedural objections to its implementation.


Posted by pwnallthethings on Sunday, June 18th, 2017 7:15pm


77 likes, 29 retweets
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kleer001
5 days ago
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I'm baffled at people mistaking the figurative for the literal.
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the entendrant

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the theoretical entendricist, seeking new impossible categories of flirtation

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kleer001
8 days ago
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And negative entendre?
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Decades

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In the 90s, our variety radio station used the tagline "the best music of the 70s, 80s, and 90s." After 2000, they switched to "the best music of the 80s, 90s, and today." I figured they'd change again in 2010, but it's 2017 and they're still saying "80s, 90s, and today." I hope radio survives long enough for us to find out how they deal with the 2020s.
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kleer001
10 days ago
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It's been lovely, I'll miss it
popular
10 days ago
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3 public comments
marcrichter
12 days ago
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A popular radio station in the Netherlands now jingles "We like the Zeroes".
tbd
Covarr
12 days ago
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The introduction of recorded audio and video media, with movie theaters and radios and all that, is like a new UNIX epoch for culture. It ended on December 31, 1999, and nobody has patched in a new one yet.
Moses Lake, WA
alt_text_bot
12 days ago
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In the 90s, our variety radio station used the tagline "the best music of the 70s, 80s, and 90s." After 2000, they switched to "the best music of the 80s, 90s, and today." I figured they'd change again in 2010, but it's 2017 and they're still saying "80s, 90s, and today." I hope radio survives long enough for us to find out how they deal with the 2020s.

Michael Lewis and the parable of the lucky man taking the extra cookie

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In 2012, Michael Lewis gave a commencement speech at Princeton University, his alma mater. In the speech, Lewis, the author of Liar’s Poker, Moneyball, and The Big Short, talks about the role of luck in rationalizing success. He tells the graduates, the winners of so many of life’s lotteries, that they “owe a debt to the unlucky”. This part near the end is worth reading even if you skip the rest of it.

I now live in Berkeley, California. A few years ago, just a few blocks from my home, a pair of researchers in the Cal psychology department staged an experiment. They began by grabbing students, as lab rats. Then they broke the students into teams, segregated by sex. Three men, or three women, per team. Then they put these teams of three into a room, and arbitrarily assigned one of the three to act as leader. Then they gave them some complicated moral problem to solve: say what should be done about academic cheating, or how to regulate drinking on campus.

Exactly 30 minutes into the problem-solving the researchers interrupted each group. They entered the room bearing a plate of cookies. Four cookies. The team consisted of three people, but there were these four cookies. Every team member obviously got one cookie, but that left a fourth cookie, just sitting there. It should have been awkward. But it wasn’t. With incredible consistency the person arbitrarily appointed leader of the group grabbed the fourth cookie, and ate it. Not only ate it, but ate it with gusto: lips smacking, mouth open, drool at the corners of their mouths. In the end all that was left of the extra cookie were crumbs on the leader’s shirt.

This leader had performed no special task. He had no special virtue. He’d been chosen at random, 30 minutes earlier. His status was nothing but luck. But it still left him with the sense that the cookie should be his.

This experiment helps to explain Wall Street bonuses and CEO pay, and I’m sure lots of other human behavior. But it also is relevant to new graduates of Princeton University. In a general sort of way you have been appointed the leader of the group. Your appointment may not be entirely arbitrary. But you must sense its arbitrary aspect: you are the lucky few. Lucky in your parents, lucky in your country, lucky that a place like Princeton exists that can take in lucky people, introduce them to other lucky people, and increase their chances of becoming even luckier. Lucky that you live in the richest society the world has ever seen, in a time when no one actually expects you to sacrifice your interests to anything.

All of you have been faced with the extra cookie. All of you will be faced with many more of them. In time you will find it easy to assume that you deserve the extra cookie. For all I know, you may. But you’ll be happier, and the world will be better off, if you at least pretend that you don’t.

You can watch Lewis’ speech as delivered on YouTube:

I wonder if hearing that moved the needle for any of those grads? I suspect not…being born on third base thinking you hit a triple is as American as apple pie at this point. (via @goldman)

Tags: commencement speeches   Michael Lewis   Princeton   video
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kleer001
14 days ago
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Excellent! Don't forget to help your lucky friends come to the same realization.
popular
14 days ago
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dmierkin
14 days ago
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well put
jheiss
16 days ago
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Well, as someone who was "born on third base" and is making decent progress on scoring a run (to keep up the analogy), I can tell you that there's at least one of us out here who is damn well aware that luck has played a significant part and does at least try to pretend that he doesn't deserve the cookie.
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